1
May

Sorbent Traps and Mercury CEMS Options

Carbonxt R&D Director, Dr. Heather Byrne served on a speaker panel during the Mcilvaine “Hot Topic Hour” addressing the choices available for monitoring mercury. As more and more U.S. utilities transition to sorbent traps over mercury CEMS, questions such as these have been raised:

Should you use sorbent traps or mercury CEMS?

  • Cost?
  • Reliability?
  • Process control?
  • Site specific variables such as mercury quantity?

Should you use both?  One for compliance and one for process control?

Does the sorbent trap also measure particulate mercury?

What about compliance aspects?  If one approach gives higher measurements than another, why not choose the one with the lower emissions and play it safe?

For more information and to view Dr. Byrne’s presentation, contact our Carbonxt office for details.

22
Jun

EPA Proposes Cutting Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Coal Plants 30% by 2030

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed a regulation Monday that would cut carbon dioxide emissions from existing coal plants by up to 30 percent by 2030 compared with 2005 levels, taking aim at one of the nation’s leading…

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23
Jan

Selection of Powdered Activated Carbon for EPA MATS Compliance

Many in the electric generating industry see powdered activated carbon (PAC) for mercury control as a commodity product where in fact incorrect carbon selection could make a difference in your yearly activated carbon costs of several hundred thousands of dollars per year. PACs are different and where they are injected in your power plant can impact their effectiveness and thus yearly costs for compliance. Therefore PAC selection should be based on more than solely cost per pound. This discussion will be based on but not limited to your plant’s coal type, air pollution control devices (existing and planned installations to comply with EPA regulations), fly ash and other by-product salability, and your plant’s overall operations and disposal requirements.  Furthermore, activated carbon manufacturing and its properties will be reviewed.

3
Dec

Full-Scale Trials of Non-Halogenated Activated Carbon for Mercury Capture

The EPA refers to activated carbon as “the most successfully demonstrated mercury-specific control technology” that also has minimal installation requirements. Within this industry, bromine and other halogens are typically applied to the activated carbon to enhance mercury oxidation and capture. However, the corrosive nature of these additives has the potential to cause larger issues for power plants with extended use. Carbonxt testing with carbon tailoring and alternative additives have shown to achieve the same or better performance results while maintaining the integrity of the plant. Recent full-scale tests have been conducted that include a span of coal and boiler types, injection location/particulate control configurations, injection rates, and concentration of SO3 (inherent and injected for flue-gas conditioning).  This presentation will review the mercury control performance and operational impacts, including particle emissions and fly ash utilization, of these recent test events.

12
Aug

Performance of Non-Halogenated Activated Carbon for Mercury Compliance

With the introduction of the first national standards for mercury pollution from power plants in December of 2011, many facilities will turn to activated carbon injection to meet the regulatory demands.  Activated carbon injection is a mature technology that is widely available and proven for achieving mercury removal greater than 90%.  In anticipation of the need, Carbonxt has developed powdered activated carbon for mercury removal from coal-fired power plant flue gas.   This product stands apart from most available mercury control sorbents in that is it non-halogenated. The Carbonxt product has been tested using full-scale activated carbon injection studies under various conditions.  The testing includes a span of coal and boiler types, injection location/particulate control configurations, injection rates, and concentration of SO3 (inherent and injected for flue-gas conditioning).  This presentation will review the mercury control performance and operational impacts, including particle emissions and fly ash utilization, of these recent test events.

1
Jul

Non-Halogenated Activated Carbon for Mercury Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue-Gas

Activated carbon injection (ACI) for the control of mercury (Hg) from Coal-Fired Power Plant (CFPP) flue-gas is an established pollution control technique.  Carbonxt has developed a line of non-halogenated activated carbons that have demonstrated high performance mercury removal.  Typically, ACI tests are completed in a sequential fashion whereby each carbon vendor demonstrates the performance of their product over a few to several day period.  When comparing brominated ACs to other brominated ACs this approach is valid.  Carbonxt designs their non-halogenated ACs for Hg capture, and have decreased AC usage for a coal-fired power plant by 50% using an engineered approach.  This presentation focuses on the benefits of this engineered approach, and further considerations for power plants as MATS compliance draws closer

11
Jan

Recent Injection Trials of MATS-PAC™ Non-Halogenated Activated Carbon in Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue-Gas

Carbonxt MATS-PAC™ is a non-halogenated activated carbon specifically designed for flue gas mercury capture at coal-fired power plant stations. The product has been verified through an intense and dynamic testing program at multiple sites utilizing various fuel types, boiler sizes, and environmental control systems.  This sorbent has demonstrated effectiveness at reduced injection rates providing utilities increased flexibility in meeting MATS compliance. Results will be presented from recent injection trials at utility and industrial boiler applications.

2
Jan

Non-Halogenated Activated Carbon for Mercury Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue-Gas

Activated carbon injection for the control of mercury (Hg) from Coal-Fired Power Plant (CFPP) flue-gas is an established pollution control technique. Carbonxt has developed a non-halogenated activated carbon that has demonstrated high performance mercury removal. This presentation includes testing at the Gulf Power Mercury Research Center (MRC), a unique testing facility used for evaluating pollution-control technologies under actual CFPP flue-gas conditions. Carbonxt has tested a number of products under various conditions (injection location/particulate control configurations, injection rate, presence of SO3).  The results varied according to the parameters adjusted but reached a maximum adsorption of 97% Hg removal.